Triple G Outfitters and Guides, Wolcott, CO
Triple G Outfitters and Guides, Wolcott, CO

Steve Thornton, Fashion Photography

About the Video

Steve was in Wolcott, Colorado, USA shooting some winter cowboy imagery. This afternoon everyone met at the ranch at 3 PM. By then the cowboys had already tacked the horses up and were ready to go. Steve grabbed his camera bag, hooked it onto the saddle horn, checked the cinch, reached up and grabbed a handful, stepped up and rode to the location with the cowboys. Once there Steve stepped off his horse and tied it to a tree. He removed the camera bag, grabbed the tripod and started looking for the location he wanted to start shooting.

Fortunately Steve shoots on this ranch on a regular basis, as a result of years of experience he already knew the general area where he wanted to be. Once started, he shot almost non-stop for 90 minutes, only stopping to move to another vantage point. By this time his feet, being in deep snow and laying/siting on the snow, had started to let him know they needed to get warm soon, like now... right now. By now the temperature was around 7° f (-14° C). Because the sun had already set about 35-40 minutes before, Steve finally relented and called it a wrap, riding the horse back to where he had started. Driving the 4WD truck back to Denver with the heat set on "high and fry", his toes returned to normal about an 1½ hour later.

Steve Thornton, Fashion Photography

For Photographers

The Gear:
Canon 5D MKIII camera set to 640 ISO with a
SmallHD monitor and hood attached, using either a
Canon 16-35mm or a 70-200mm zoom lens,
Gitzo CF tripod with a
Sachtler fluid head.

Lighting:
The sun.

Steve Thornton, Fashion Photography

Steve says when shooting in cold weather:
"It is a good idea to carry several fully charged batteries for your camera and, if you shoot with one, your monitor. If you are planning to be in the cold weather for all/most of the day, get a pouch large enough to put all of your spare batteries inside. Then depending on how cold it is, put 1 to 4 large hand warmers (the 18 hour kind) inside the pouch. This way you will be installing not just a fresh battery, but a very warm one too. I have shot in -27°F (-33°C) weather before and this really helps to keep you shooting in bitter cold weather."

Try very hard to have just one battery type for your cameras and monitors. This way you don't have to bring two different types of batteries in sufficient numbers, you only have one type. The only other battery I use is a AA. By keeping the different types to a minimum, you stand a good chance of not having a problem of running out of power.

"Or if you can drive to the location, keep the car/truck/van running with the heat on high. This way not only can you recharge your batteries with an adapter, you and the crew can get warmed up.

Important: Leave the cameras and lenses outside, but bring the batteries in. Being very cold the camera and lenses might fog up if the car is warm and has a lot of people breathing exhaling a lot of moisture in the car. Or you can bag all of your gear inside Zip Lock bags, sucking as much air out of them as possible before sealing, and then bring them into the car. Remove the gear outside of the warm and moisture laden car."

Steve continues, "I have only zip locked my gear on one occasion, I was concerned that if left the gear out for long in the bitter cold wind that something might freeze or slow down, like the iris in the lenses. I'm not sure it would have happened, but by taking the step to bag the stuff I did not have any such problems. Either it would not have happened or because I took this step it did not happen. Either way I got the shots."

Another tip: Be sure to full the car's gas tank if you are going to be in a remote location, it may save your life if something goes awry,

Steve Thornton, Fashion Photography

If you would like to use this image, or any of my images for mock or comp use, please just ask. There is never a charge for this service. Educational use is permitted without charge, unless published, but please ask first. All commercial use is available only with a limited copyright release prior to use from the copyright holder, Steve Thornton. Thanks for looking!

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